Monday, February 8, 2016

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson





Even reading teachers have reading gaps, and for me the graphic novel is David Letterman’s front teeth. I can only partially blame this gap on residual snobbery from my youth, an ill-conceived notion that graphic novels are not “worthy” stories. As part of my redemption I resolved this year to read more graphic novels, and what finer text to begin with than Noelle Stevenson’s National Book Award finalist Nimona.

The publisher listed the following on the back cover to help establish the tone:

Nemeses!
Dragons!
Science!
Symbolism!

But wait: There’s more I need to add!

Text!
Subtext!
Codpieces!
Sass!
Sharks!
Shapeshifting!
Genuine emotions!
Onomatopoeia!
Heroes!
Villains!
Archers!
Archvillains!
Origin Stories!
Mad Scientists!
Somewhat calmer Scientists!
Hair color changes!
Churros!
Sidekicking!
Asskicking!
Comic timing!
Facetiming!
Just in time narrative saves!
Winking knowingness!
Oldtimeyness!


Nimona is a joy, albeit one filled with the inevitable sadness we find when we stop winking and recognize that growth is inevitably loss, no matter what shape we grow into. Read this and mind your own gaps.


back to main page

1 comment:

Kelly Fineman said...

Sounds great! I hope you'll read the ones I've posted about here - the George O'Connor ones about Greek Gods are brilliant. And in March, I'll be posting about The Nameless City.